Life

House Life

Residential Programs (RP) List


FY - First Year= open to first-year students
UP - Upper Class= open to upperclass students
C - Credit= optional academic credit
Click a program listing title to expand and explore in detail.



FY - First Year= open to first-year students
UP - Upper Class= open to upperclass students
C - Credit= optional academic credit
Click a program listing title to expand and explore in detail.


FY - First Year= open to first-year students
UP - Upper Class= open to upperclass students
C - Credit= optional academic credit
Click a program listing title to expand and explore in detail.


World Cultures and Languages

Open to Upperclass Students

“And what is still far stranger than that is that not only does one branch of knowledge come to be in us while another passes away and that we are never the same even in respect of our knowledge, but that each single piece of knowledge has the same fate. For what we call studying exists because knowledge is leaving us, because forgetting is the departure of knowledge, while studying puts back a fresh memory in place of what went away, thereby preserving a piece of knowledge, so that it seems to be the same.”

– The Symposium
                                

These words have been read for millennia, but how – and why – do we still engage critically with some of the most ancient thinkers? It is fitting that one of the oldest Residential Programs bridges the gap between antiquity and modernity through an interdisciplinary approach set in an intimate community. Resident Advisors and Graduate Associates (RAGAs) and residents in the Ancient Studies RP collaborate on activities that include trips to relevant museum exhibits and Penn and in the Philadelphia area, discussions with professors and notable figures in ancient studies, and weekly themed social events. These events and activities are shaped by residents’ interests each year and encompass exploration of ancient cultures, politics, philosophy, performance, etc. This program is well-suited for the student who takes initiative, is dedicated to the mission of residential programming, and is seeking intellectual and personal growth.

Program Goals: The Program provides an intellectual and social space for students who wish to interact both broadly and deeply with the art, languages, literature, and philosophies from ancient times. At the conclusion of the academic year, residents will have developed their critical thinking skills, taken on leadership roles, and engaged with these topics through an interdisciplinary model. 

Participant Expectations: The Program RAGAs will review details and activities at the beginning of the academic year, where residents will receive their Ancient Studies Compact. Residents will be expected to participate in the following, as decided by the RAGAs:

  • 1 major event per month
  • 1 minor event per month
  • Implement 1 minor floor event as determined by the RAGAs
  • Host 1 House program per semester
Program Location: 14th & 15th floors

Special Amenities: Program lounges, priority reservations




Contact:
Courtney Dombroski, Harnwell College House Dean
harnwell@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Ancient Studies


This program has 64 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

The Harnwell Cultures Collective brings together three tracks of programming: East Asia House, the International Program, and the Latin American Residential Program. Cultures Collective residents will showcase the integrated experience and interconnectedness of cultural commonality in scholarly and creative presentations at the annual Harnwell Symposium. This program is well-suited for the student who takes initiative, is dedicated to the mission of the Cultures Collective, and is seeking intellectual and personal growth.

Program Goals: The Program invites residents to expand their understanding of other cultures and foster an appreciation for living in an intercultural community. At the conclusion of the academic year, residents will have developed their critical thinking skills, taken on leadership roles, and engaged with these topics through an interdisciplinary model.

Participant Expectations: The Program RAGAs will review details and activities at the beginning of the academic year, where residents will receive their Cultures Collective Compact. Residents will be expected to participate in the following, as decided by the RAGAs:

  • 1 major event per month
  • 1 minor event per month
  • Implement 1 minor floor event as determined by the RAGAs
  • Host 1 House program per semester
Program Location: 16th–20th floors

Special Amenities: Program lounges, priority reservations




Contact:
Courtney Dombroski, Harnwell College House Dean
harnwell@collegehouses.upenn.edu




This program has 165 members.
Open to First-year Students

This lively program emphasizes global thinking from its members and provides a cross-cultural living experience, complemented by colorful and multifaceted activities. Members shape its direction and celebrate the range and variety of cultures that make up the Penn and Philadelphia communities. Leadership and interactive learning are vitally important, and members enjoy sharing their experiences with each and other House residents. Students from all ethnicities, religions and nationalities live together in a multicultural and multinational setting and reap all of the benefits that diversity brings-making this strong well-rounded House even stronger.

Goals: The Living Cultures Program gives first-year students an introduction to Penn’s multicultural environment. It also provides students from different backgrounds with the opportunity to step outside their comfort zones, to take on leadership roles, and to experience interactive learning within a diverse, supportive community.

Program Location:

Special Amenities:




Contact:
Marilynne Diggs-Thompson, Riepe House Dean
diggst@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Living Cultures Residential Program


This program has 27 members.
Open to First-year Students
Open to Upperclass Students
Optional Academic Credit

The Modern Languages Program (MLP), based in Class of 1925, is made up of five language groups: Arabic House, Casa Hispanica, Chinese House, Deutsches Haus and Maison Française. These programs are staffed by resident Program Directors who are accomplished graduate students (often native speakers) chosen to promote the goals of language immersion and cultural exposure. Each group meets 2-4 times a week for meals, chats, media screenings and excursions, consisting of everything from language Pictionary to cooking instruction to opera and dance. These close-knit communities have members from all four class years, with some veterans taking on a guiding role; many participants are interested in international business, law, or careers in diplomacy, and often plan to study abroad while at Penn. Both beginners and those with considerable language fluency are welcome; dedicated residents often show great improvement in their speaking skills, and have the option of receiving course credit in French, German, Spanish or Arabic (Chinese does not offer the credit option).

Program Goals: The program aims to provide students with regular language practice and diverse cultural experiences. 

Requirements: Although specific requirements vary across the different language groups, students who choose to enroll in the for-credit option for Arabic, Spanish, German, or French can expect to participate in 2-3 events each week held entirely in the target language.  There is no required written component.  Enrollment is a half credit per semester for a maximum of two semesters.  Chinese House meets on the same schedule, though of course regular participation is optional.

Program Location: Class of '25

Special Amenities: Viewing Lounge




Contact:
Dr. Christopher Donovan, Gregory College House Dean
cdonovan@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Modern Languages Program


This program has 81 members.

Arts & Letters

Open to Upperclass Students

“Of such wisdom, the poetic passion, the desire of beauty, the love of art for its own sake, has most. For art comes to you proposing frankly to give nothing but the highest quality to your moments as they pass, and simply for those moments’ sake.”

– Walter Pater

How often do you experience moments as inspired by art? In all of art’s iterations and all the ways in which we engage with art, we can quickly lose track of those essential moments. As residents of Arts House Residential Program, you will continue to be advocates of the arts. This call challenges residents to be more than consumers of the arts, and will create opportunities to experience, philosophically contemplate, and showcase art in your campus home.

By experiencing highlights of Philadelphia’s artistic offerings, such as Opera on the Mall, First Friday gallery openings, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and theater performances, Arts House can engage with and think about the process and presentation of artistic endeavors. Each spring semester, residents model those experiences with the annual Arts House Gallery Opening, which features local artists – visual, musical, performance – in Harnwell’s gallery and theater spaces. 

This program is well-suited for the student who takes initiative, is dedicated to the mission of art advocacy, and is seeking intellectual and personal growth.

Program Goals: The Program invites residents to expand their understanding of the arts and foster an appreciation of different genres of art and learn more about the history of artists, composers, and particular works of art.  Program residents will also have the opportunity to form and communicate opinions about various issues in the arts within a safe, supportive community. At the conclusion of the academic year, residents will have developed their critical thinking skills, taken on leadership roles, and engaged with these topics through an interdisciplinary model. 

Participant Expectations: The Program RAGAs will review details and activities at the beginning of the academic year, where residents will receive their Arts House Compact. Residents will be expected to participate in the following, as decided by the RAGAs:

  • 1 major event per month
  • 1 minor event per month
  • Implement 1 minor floor event as determined by the RAGAs
  • Host 1 House program per semester
Program Location: 12th and 13th floors

Special Amenities: Program lounges, priority reservations




Contact:
Courtney Dombroski, Harnwell College House Dean
harnwell@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Arts House


This program has 63 members.
Open to First-year Students
Open to Upperclass Students
Optional Academic Credit

The Film Culture Program (FCP) is devoted to movie lovers interested in expanding their knowledge of the art form beyond just summer blockbusters and Oscar winners (though we like those too).

Our intimate, newly-renovated cinema lounge hosts a packed schedule of screenings and discussions (often more than 150 per year) covering  the medium’s history and the scope of world cinema today. (We post the trailers for the films we screen on our Facebook page— check out our current lineup!) This low-pressure program also sponsors a student-made film festival, takes regular trips to Philadelphia-area theaters (sometimes for advanced screenings), and encourages participants to write screenplays and try their hand at film-making. Even better, FCP members can choose to enroll in the program for academic credit and receive a grade for their active participation.

Program Goals: The program aims to introduce students to a wide range of films and to provide considerable practice discussing the art form.

Requirements: Although we hope all participants will participate in screenings and discussions from time to time, there is no formal expectation except for those residents who opt to enroll for credit.  For enrolled students, requirements include attendance at 10 in-House screenings and 3 excursions, along with an oral presentation and active engagement in discussions.  Enrollment is a half credit per semester for a maximum of two semesters.

Program Location: Van Pelt 4th Floor

Special Amenities: Cinema




Contact:
Dr. Christopher Donovan, Gregory College House Dean
cdonovan@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Film Culture


This program has 40 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

Members will assist in the production of Front Row’s productions including the company’s NSO, Fall, Winter, and Spring productions.   Members will also coordinate community service projects planned in connection with Front Row’s performances.  In addition, members of the program will collaborate in readings of plays and the creation of original dramatic and artistic works to be presented in Harrison College House.  In partnership with the Penn Art Club members of the program will meet local artists and alumni (playwrights, visual artists, and performers) to gain different perspectives about the arts community. Find out more on the Front Row Theatre website, and check out the Penn Art Club website.

Goals: Harrison’s Front Row Theatre Company Program provides its participants with the opportunity to encounter and study a broad range of artistic media and expression; to learn from other program residents, who come from diverse academic and artistic backgrounds; to take artistic risks within a supportive community.

Expectations: Members of the program will be expected to participate in Harrison’s Front Row Theatre; organize and participate in Harrison’s regular Art-In programs; organize and attend Harrison’s Art Speakers Series; develop Harrison’s original art series through collaborations in playwriting, filmmaking, or other formsof expressive arts.

Location: Harrison’s Front Row and the Arts Community Program in Harrison will be located on the 7th and 8th floors of Harrison College House.  

Program Location: 7th and 8th floors

Special Amenities: N/A




Contact:
Dr. Frank Pellicone, Harrison House Dean
frankpel@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Front Row Theatre & the Arts


This program has 70 members.
Open to First-year Students

This program is designed for students who have a broad academic interest in mass media and communications, ranging from the advertising and mass media industries to television and film portrayals of particular groups to the ways in which digital media impact society.

Activities in this program include attending events featuring prominent individuals in the media world, engaging in critical discussions about mass media and culture, watching riveting documentaries, and connecting for fun social events. In the spring semester, there is a “dinner and a movie” film series that highlights superb documentaries and films.

Goals: This program provides interested students with an opportunity to engage in critical thought around the issues of mass media and to think about and discuss the ways in which media affect individuals’ thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors as well as our society as a whole.

Program Location:

Special Amenities:




Contact:
Nadine Gabbadon, House Fellow, Fisher Hassenfeld College House
nadineg@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Goldberg Media and Communications Program


This program has 43 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

Housed on the 18th floor of Harrison College House, participants in the Harrison residence live with other students interested in all aspects of cinema. Students with proven interests in creating film, viewing films, and conducting scholarly research around issues of cinema, unite to share experiences around cinema and to promote film culture at Penn. Participants in the Harrison Cinema in Residence program must either enroll in Cinema 180 or participate in the planning of the course and the presenting of material. Participants of the Cinema in Residence Program join house staff on outings to cinema houses, film festivals, and other events of interest. They also enjoy outings and other events exclusively available to participants. Members of the Harrison Cinema in Residence program also curate the Harrison Late Night movie series.

Applicants, in addition to the general residential program application are asked to complete a 4-5 paragraph movie review for a movie that the student believes should be included in Harrison’s Cinema in Residence syllabus.

Program Location: 18th Floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge




Contact:
Nicola Gentili, Harrison College House Fellow
ngentili@sas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Harrison Cinema in Residence


This program has 34 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

The Integrated Living Program (ILP) seeks to explore a broad range of ideas through an interdisciplinary lens in a residential setting. Based on the successful Integrated Studies Program in Riepe College House, ILP brings together students of multiple schools, backgrounds, majors, and interests to promote discussion, community-building, and critical thought. Different aspects of a semester’s theme are explored each month, through films, books, or talks, which culminate in a dinner at which ILPers discuss that month’s events.

Program events stress both the academic and social elements of the program with an even mix of the two. Prior events have included a Quentin Tarantino movie series, trips to the Philadelphia Orchestra and Philadelphia Art Museum, a discussion of ‘Brave New World’, and talks by some of the most esteemed faculty at Penn.

ILP is open to all interested applicants, regardless of school, major, or prior participation in BFS/ISP. Applicants should be open to intellectual risk-taking in a supportive, multidisciplinary community setting, and have a history of engagement in their College House or in a similar program.

Expectations: Residents are expected to participate in ILP events in order to foster discussion, explore the subject matter, and to help build a “community of thought”.

Program Location: 19th and 20th floors

Special Amenities: N/A




Contact:
Dr. Frank Pellicone, Harrison College House Dean
frankpel@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Integrated Living Program


This program has 102 members.
Open to First-year Students
Optional Academic Credit

The Music and Social Change program explores the many ways in which individuals use music in their everyday lives to develop who they are and, often subconsciously, to advance their own social and economic position. Through an academic course, volunteering in music classrooms in West Philadelphia, and attending concerts together, participants will investigate how music is used to construct larger social and economic networks that we call culture. The ongoing interdisciplinary debate about the value of popular, Western “classical,” and transnational music in the education and everyday lives of young people will be a focus.
 
This residential program is special in two ways- first, it requires that residents donate 3 hours per week to volunteering in a West Philadelphia music class for the entire academic year and second, all residents take a Freshman Seminar together spread across the first-year (as a .5cu course in Fall and Spring terms). In addition, the program includes attending concerts together across Philadelphia in a wide range of genres and styles, exploring the history of West Philadelphia's educational and musical institutions, and having dinner discussions with academics whose work specializes in the ties between music, social class, race, and economic mobility.
 
The volunteer component of the residential program will take students either to West Philadelphia High School to work with choir or general music classes or to Henry C. Lea Elementary School to work with an after school music program with band, orchestra, choir or homework help.  In past year, participants have been able to work around their own academic schedules but our typical volunteer options are Mon-Tues-Wed between 3-6pm at the Elementary School or Fridays between noon-3pm at the High School.  The program will work around students' schedules as best we can, and some students have been able to assist school-day teachers at alternate times as well.
 
The residential program is also supported by a very knowledgeable residential associate, who will either be a graduate student in Music or an undergraduate who has been through the course or residential program before.  The residential associate lives with all participants and plays a crucial role in helping to organize concert outings, leading group activities, and providing ongoing support to students in the program.
 
Students in the Music and Social Change program are not required to read music or to be accomplished performing musicians, although participants must have a passion for music, an interest in working with youth in our community, and the willingness and flexibility to try new things.  Participants who have musical skills and are interested in taking on leadership positions, such as more hands-on teaching, will be encouraged to do so.

Program Location:

Special Amenities:




Contact:
Lulu Barrueco Kaliher, Acting House Dean
lkaliher@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Music and Social Change


This program has 19 members.
Open to First-year Students

Perspectives in the Humanities is a community focused on the elevated appreciation of the arts and the humanities through shared experiences. Members of Perspectives in the Humanities come from diverse backgrounds, but are united by a common passion for the humanities. One need not study the humanities to apply—the program merely calls for a genuine interest and desire to spend time with fellow humanists. PiH is dedicated to fostering an appreciation and the discussion of the humanities at Penn: in the arts and music, literature, languages, theater, history, philosophy, anthropology, religion, jurisprudence, ethics, and beyond.  Signature events include the Penn Author Forum, speakeasy events, theater and museum outings in Philadelphia, and notable cultural events within the city. PiH is open to all members of the Penn community, even to those who don’t reside in KCECH. PiH is a student run program and functions like a club.

Goals: The goal of PiH is to create an environment conducive to studying and enjoying the humanities beyond the classroom, where students feel comfortable discussing their creative thoughts with others, both formally and socially.

Program Location: KC 3rd floor

Special Amenities: N/A




Contact:
Dr. M. Krimo Bokreta, Kings Court English College House Dean
bokreta@pobox.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Perspectives in the Humanities


This program has 23 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

The Rodin Arts Collective (TRAC) aims to provide engagement-based opportunities for students to appreciate and analyze various types of "art" with a community of their peers, supplementing their curricular education at Penn. TRAC encompasses three main forms of art: Music, Theatre, and Visual arts:

Music Engagement: We create a structured environment that fosters musical growth as players, listeners, attendees at live performances, citizens engaged in community outreach, and/or scholars. It’s about respecting the power of music to shape us--our relationships to ourselves, with others, in personal contexts, professional endeavors, civic engagement, and about opening a window into larger humanistic discourse.

Theatre Engagement: We impart knowledge in various approaches and opportunities related to theatre (i.e. musicals, drama, Shakespeare, Eastern arts, etc.); teach students how to critique both theater as art and theater as entertainment; and help residents increase or establish an appreciation of the impact of theater on social movements.

Visual Arts Engagement: We aim to develop a structured environment that fosters our ability to create, curate, critique, and therefore contribute to visual culture.

The combined efforts of TRAC enrich our understanding of the individual arts and blurs the boundaries among them.

Program Location: 9th floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge with piano




Contact:
Jamuna Samuel & Mauro Calcagno, Rodin College House Fellows
samuelja@sas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
The Rodin Arts Collective (TRAC)


This program has 84 members.

Identity & Self

Open to Upperclass Students

Through experiential programming, interactions with staff, and connecting to campus resources we encourage students in the BL(o)C to integrate wellness into all aspects of their Rodin experience. The BL(o)C provides students the opportunity to engage with seven dimensions of wellness to improve their quality of life and enrich their experience at Penn. The seven dimensions of wellness are: Social, Emotional, Spiritual, Environmental, Occupational, Intellectual, Physical.

Program Objectives: 

  • Identify and articulate a personal definition of wellness that integrates the seven dimensions
  • Identifying holistic wellness “strengths” and “weaknesses” in your own life, and developing a plan for addressing the areas where you want to experience additional grow in terms of wellness
  • Challenge themselves, through healthful living practices, to strive for wholeness and balance in their lives.
Program Location: 23rd floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge




Contact:
Megan Robb, Rodin College House Fellow
robbme@sas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Balanced Living Community - BL(o)C


This program has 24 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

The JCS Program connects residents to academic programming, facilitates interfaith dialogue, and creates new opportunities for residents to learn more about Jewish culture while building both a floor and a house community.   

Past JCS events have included Shabbat celebrations and a challah making night. Residents regularly participate in prayer services as a community, and JCS has a strong relationship with Hillel.

JCS also offers students the chance to shape their Residential Program experience by taking on leadership roles and planning events for the floor and the House.

Program Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of Jewish Culture in order to appreciate history and tradition

  • Encourage dialogue about Jewish Culture in order to consider different viewpoints

  • Create opportunities for members of the non-Jewish community to experience and learn about Jewish Culture

  • Study Jewish Culture in a way that supplements one’s curricular education at Penn

  • Develop relationships and network

  • Identify ways in which they can contributed to building a the Rodin community

Expectations and Participation:  Members of the JCS floor should expect to attend floor meetings, participate in the annual Rodin Showcase, and generally be active members of their floor and House communites.  

Program Location: 2nd floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge




Contact:
Kathryn McDonald, Rodin College House Dean
kmcdo@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Jewish Cultural Studies Program


This program has 33 members.

Science, Technology, Engineering & Math

Open to First-year Students

Biosphere provides an exciting and fun atmosphere to all residents with an interest in the environment and in how people interact with the world around them. Biosphere evolves each year with its residents, who themselves control the specific direction the program will take. Volunteerism tends to characterize the spirit of student participation, with members often occupied with such activities as UC Green tree-plantings, involvement in the MLK Day of Service, and the House’s Courtyard Garden upkeep. Exploring all that Philadelphia has to offer means outings to the Franklin Institute, Morris Arboretum, Chinatown, the Italian Market, the Liberty Bell, and the Zoo, as well as sampling Philly restaurants. Horseback riding, skiing, canoeing, and exploring Philadelphia-area nature preserves are fun ways to interact with the natural environment, while regular faculty talks, workshops and educational opportunities better acquaint students with their academic environment.

Whether you are pre-medical student interested in health, society, and community outreach; the student scientist hoping to save the rain forest; the business major who wants to start up a company; or the student in the humanities examining the cultural and ethical impacts of greenhouse effect and climate change, the Biosphere program can offer a great living and learning experience unlike any other.

Goals: Biosphere sets out to provide participating students a greater appreciation for and understanding of their impact on the ecosystem and on one another, through their explorations of Penn, the greater Philadelphia area, and their own community interactions.

 

Program Location: KC 1st floor

Special Amenities: N/A




Contact:
Dr. M. Krimo Bokreta, Kings Court English College House Dean
bokreta@pobox.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Biosphere: The Active Experience


This program has 13 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

Residents of the Eco-House work together to reduce their environmental impact and to engage the campus and broader community on sustainability issues through personal choices, projects, and events. Students interested in living in the Eco House must complete a short application, including a personal statement outlining their interest in this unique living environment. The Eco-House would be well suited for students who are considering to major in environmental science, environmental studies, biology, geology, or other natural science related fields; however, no experience with sustainability is required; residents must merely have an interest in learning more about sustainability and sustainable living habits.  Residents will engage in a variety of exciting activities and workshops to enhance their sustainable living skills throughout the academic school year.

Purpose: demonstrate affordable sustainable living in order to inform, engage and inspire Penn’s fellow residents, visitors, and community members.

Events for the floor may include:

  • Eco House faculty dinner
  • Meet with professors within the Earth and Environmental Science Department as well as other STEM related fields in an informal setting to learn about classes, research, and what they think it takes to become a successful environmental leader or environmental professional
  • Service-learning field trips
  • Work with local environmental non-profit organizations to bring environmental change:
    • planting trees for ecological restoration
    • trips to Morris Arboretum (drawing workshops)
    • learning about local environmental policy
    • harvesting locally-grown vegetables at Bartram’s Garden
  • Tours of earth-friendly practices at Penn
    • tours of university's newest LEED-certified building
    • tree/ecology tour
    • King’s Court green roof visit
  • Recycled Art Showcase
  • Eco House Booth at Green Fest
  • Social activities: weekly study breaks, hiking, kayaking, making bird feeders, planting flowers, watching environmental documentaries, volunteering in the community garden, Eco DIYS (DIY’s out of recycled or natural, recyclable materials)
Program Location: 1st Floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge, first-floor library




Contact:
Courtney Dombroski, Harnwell House Dean
cdombr@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Eco-House


This program has 22 members.
Open to First-year Students

Extending beyond Kings Court English House, the Science and Technology Wing (STWing) is a network of over two hundred undergraduates, graduate students, professors, and alumni from the University of Pennsylvania whose members share a strong interest in the science and technologies that permeate everyday life. While its reach is campus-wide, however, STWing’s simultaneous status as a residential program helps maintain a flourishing intellectual and social community foundation both for the College House and the larger society. A great synergetic learning community, STWingers are always getting together to build something – from blimps to space camera – relying on their collective knowledge of physics, engineering, computer science, as well as art and sense of humor to do so. In addition to these inventive pursuits, the pioneering residents of STWing have for years owned and maintained their own timesharing servers, raised money to fund a research fellowship, and helped produce a science journal of undergraduate research. Throughout the year the program hosts a dinner-discussion series to which University faculty, staff, and interesting non-Penn guests are invited, as well as purely social events planned by students. The program is entirely student run by its Continuum (Student Governance), though students often work closely with faculty on their projects and with House staff in planning their social activities.

Goals: STWing sets out to provide its members with the connections, structure, and resources (financial and otherwise) necessary to pursue projects of their own interests. The network faculty and alumni of associated with the program provides a personalized mentoring experience within this community context. The program teaches students to dare, but also to have fun and be collaborative in the process.

For more information: E-mail info@stwing.upenn.edu.

Program Location: KC 2nd floor

Special Amenities: Workshop space "Blimp Room"




Contact:
Dr. Jorge Santiago-Aviles, Faculty Director
santiago@seas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Science and Technology Wing (STWing)


This program has 48 members.
Open to First-year Students

This program for freshmen offers guidance to Fisher Hassenfeld residents interested in gaining experience in a biomedical research laboratory.  Activities include meetings, workshops, dinners, speakers, individual advising, and “field” trips to laboratories in Penn’s School of Medicine.  Under the direction of Dr. Paul Axelsen, College House Faculty Fellow and Professor of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine, participants will gain the skills needed to find, contact, and engage one of the many active research programs on campus. 

Program Goals: This program will provide students with a basic introduction to the many ways that biomedical research is conducted at Penn, and the opportunities available to undergraduates.

Requirements: Students interested in participating should be in the College of Arts and Sciences, and at least tentatively planning to major in a science.  They should also plan to remain on the Penn campus during the summer following their freshman year to begin their research experience.

Program Location:

Special Amenities:




Contact:
Prof. Paul H. Axelsen MD, Fisher Hassenfeld College House Fellow
axe@pharm.med.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Scientific Adventures


This program has 20 members.
Open to First-year Students

Under the leadership of Dr. Helen Davies, Professor of Microbiology in the School of Medicine, students on this floor participate in a variety of activities, including a monthly research forum, faculty lectures and dinners, museum trips, and site visits to labs. Residents in this program have access to a wealth of science resources across the university. Additionally, students are invited to meet with Dr. Davies for a biweekly roundtable on emerging infectious diseases. This program is located on 2nd floor, Coxe/EF Smith.

Program Location:

Special Amenities:




Contact:
Ms. Amanda Atkinson, Ware College House Dean
ware@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Study of Infectious Diseases


This program has 18 members.
Open to First-year Students

Women in Computer Science, Kings Court English’s newest program, was born out of an awareness that with women representing fewer than 15% of all computer scientists, female undergraduate who aspire to enter the field of Computer Science could benefit from the structure, community, and mentoring of a residential program. WiCS provides residents with opportunities to study together, to mentor and advise one another, and to build confidence within a non-competitive environment. Members of the well-established KCECH program, the Science and Technology Wing (STWing), also work supportively and collaboratively with the WiCS program. Topics of learning include Web development, Android development, Linux, and more through workshops held in the House or co-sponsored with the departments of Computer Science or Digital Media Design. Activities include social coding programs, dinners with faculty members, and trips to visit tech companies like Google; these events may be co-sponsored with organizations such as the CSE-sponsored, non-residential WiCS organization, Weiss Tech House, the Dining Philosophers, and the Women’s Center, among others.

Goals: WiCS’s mission is to provide a safe, supportive living-learning environment for women who study computer science and hope to one day make their careers in that field. As part of that mission, the program seeks to provide faculty and peer mentorship especially to the youngest members of the community.

Program Location: EH 3rd Floor

Special Amenities: N/A




Contact:
Dr. Jorge Santiago-Aviles, Faculty Director
santiago@seas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Women in Computer Science


This program has 12 members.
Open to First-year Students

The Women in Science Floor focuses on increasing the participation and success of women in all fields of science. Under the advisement of Dr. Helen Davies, Professor of Microbiology in the School of Medicine, the group works closely with the Philadelphia chapter of the Association of Women in Science on sponsoring lectures and programs. Activities include mentoring young girls who are interested in pursuing a career in science and faculty dinners with women scientists in the greater Philadelphia area. This program is located on 2nd floor of Coxe/EF Smith.

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Contact:
Amanda Atkinson, Ware College House Dean
ware@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Women in Science


This program has 14 members.

Penn Course Communities

Open to First-year Students
Optional Academic Credit

The Huntsman Program for International Studies and Business (IS&B) is the residential component of the IS&B academic program co-sponsored by the School of Arts and Sciences and The Wharton School. Located on the 3rd floor of Kings Court, it fosters global awareness and understanding of economic, cultural, social, linguistic, and technological issues in the international arena.

First-year students accepted into the academic program must live in Kings Court English College House.  

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Contact:
Dr. M. Krimo Bokreta, Kings Court English College House Dean
bokreta@pobox.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Huntsman Program for International Studies and Business


This program has 48 members.
Open to First-year Students
Optional Academic Credit

Integrated Studies is one of Penn's most distinctive opportunities for incoming freshmen. It is a residentially-based, year-long, intensive liberal arts program, specifically for College students who have been admitted as Benjamin Franklin Scholars. Those College students accepted into BFS will live together in Riepe College House and take half their freshman-year courses in Integrated Studies. This program will invite some of Penn's most intellectually ambitious students to consider broad topics such as justice, time, human nature, identity, origins, and change from an array of perspectives: in the physical sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. These courses will be guided by some of the brightest lights in Penn's galaxy of faculty stars and include weekly “jam sessions” with the entire Integrated Studies community — in dedicated in-House space — to discuss how it all fits into a broader liberal arts approach to the world. Support will be provided by Dr. Dennis DeTurck, Faculty Director, Dean of The College and Professor of Mathematics; and Dr. Ralph Rosen, College House Fellow, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Classical Studies. The goal of this program is to help broadly-curious intellectual risk-takers find each other and find the pleasures of discovery and wonder — the hallmarks of liberal arts learning.

Note: There are three requirements for membership in the Integrated Studies Program in Riepe.

  1. You must separately apply for the Benjamin Franklin Scholars / Integrated Studies academic program in The College and be accepted.
  2. You must list the Integrated Studies program in Riepe as your first choice when you apply for housing. (You should also list your second and third housing preferences carefully in the event that you are not accepted into BFS.)  Visit housing application instructions here.  
  3. Students must have accepted their place in the incoming class in the College in Penn.

Students who have not completed all three parts of the application process will not be able to be considered for Integrated Studies. There will be no exceptions.

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Contact:
Prof. Peter Struck, BFS Director
struck@sas.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Integrated Studies Program


This program has 74 members.

Leadership Development

Open to Upperclass Students

Kings Court English Upperclass Programs are available to upperclass residents of KCECH who wish to participate in the Residential Programs in the House. Upperclassmen may apply to:

  • Upperclass Perspectives in the Humanities
  • Upperclass Women in Computer Science
  • Upperclass STWing
  • Upperclass Biosphere

For information about the content of the programs, see the link below.

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Contact:
Dr. M. Krimo Bokreta, House Dean
bokreta@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
KCECH Upperclass Programs


This program has 28 members.
Open to Upperclass Students

Residents are encouraged to assess their present leadership abilities, actively pursue personal leadership development and build meaningful relationships with other floor members through events, dinners, workshops, and social activities. Additionally, each year the LRP in Rodin will focus on a specific theme around leadership. The theme for 2018-2019 is "Leadership and Community Engagement".

Program Objectives:

  • Identify individual strengths and pursue leadership opportunities that will help to build upon and capitalize on those strengths.

  • Analyze and apply a variety of leadership theories to current projects and opportunities on campus.

  • Observe and learn from leaders in a variety of capacities.

  • Engage in social entrepreneurship and servant leadership.

  • Develop relationships and network.

  • Identify ways in which they contributed to building a floor and a House community.

Expectations and Participation: Members of the LRP floor should expect to attend floor meetings, participate in the annual Rodin Showcase, and generally be active members of their floor and House communites.

Program Location: 19th floor

Special Amenities: Program lounge




Contact:
Karu Kozuma, Rodin College House Fellow
kozuma@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Leadership Residential Program


This program has 35 members.
Open to First-year Students

Members of the Mentors Program form a unique team dedicated to serving children in West Philadelphia public schools. Under the direction of senior faculty at Penn's Graduate School of Education, participants mentor children in elementary and middle school, devoting at least two hours a week to such activities, as well as attending monthly dinners with faculty to discuss their experiences.

Goals: The Mentors program aims to familiarize its residents with West Philadelphia by connecting them with children who live and attend West Philadelphia schools. In the process, mentors learn about the challenges facing kids in Philadelphia’s educational system, while also learning about the talents and great potential of these students. Throughout the year, mentors have the opportunity to develop their own leadership skills, gain exceptional pre-career experience, and discover the rewards of community service.

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Contact:
Dr. Betsy Rymes, Riepe College House Fellow
brymes@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Mentors Program


This program has 24 members.
Open to First-year Students

Women have broken through the glass ceiling enjoying successful careers in politics, journalism, medicine; leading fortune 500 companies; and being accomplished artists, performers and musicians. But have you ever wondered how they got there? What was their major in college and did they use their major to get there? What are the challenges specific to being a woman leader in today's world?

The core of this program is two-fold:

(1) to increase understanding of gender dynamics in academic and professional environments, and (2) to provide information in the form of real-life examples of how women have become distinguished Penn Alumnae.

The program will highlight the range of careers that exist for Penn graduates, specifically by inviting accomplished women across the university and beyond from their respective fields for interactive discussions. Participants will hear how the speakers have broken the mold from an executive, entrepreneur, professor, and recent working alumna perspective, while making meaningful contacts with important professional mentors.

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Contact:
Amanda Atkinson, Ware College House Dean
ware@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Penn Women in Leadership


This program has 18 members.
Open to First-year Students

Policy, Politics and Social Change participants will explore topics of policy and political interest and how societal concerns get translated into policy and practice through formal and informal discussions, speakers representing diverse multi-disciplinary perspectives from within Penn and the broader community and ‘hands-on’ volunteer experiences. The challenges of policy development and implementation, particularly within the context of cyclical U.S. political elections, will be a major focus.

Program Goals: This program gives program participants the chance to learn more about the complexities of American politics, and the difficulty in translating policy into realizable solutions to social, political, and economic problems.

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Contact:
Lulu Barrueco Kaliher, Acting House Dean
lkaliher@upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Policy, Politics and Social Change


This program has 20 members.
Open to First-year Students

The Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program invites students from all academic backgrounds to participate. The group explores the opportunities and challenges for scientific, technological, and social innovation, in areas from machine learning to musicology and from medicine to politics. Through dinners, workshops, and field trips, students will meet and talk with researchers and entrepreneurs from Penn, the region, and the world.

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Contact:
Amanda Atkinson, Ware College House Dean
ware@collegehouses.upenn.edu

For more information and application instructions, see:
Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship


This program has 50 members.